Cardiff Pudding

Why is it that some traditional puddings stand the test of time, while others are largely forgotten? Some may be overcomplicated, others may not suit modern tastes. Maybe the ingredients are hard to come by now, maybe they’re just kind of boring?

It’s fun to try puddings and desserts from the past, just for the novelty and nostalgia, so it’s even better to find a pudding which is so amazing you’ll want to make it again and again. I found this gem in a book from 1935.

I really don’t understand why Cardiff Pudding isn’t at the top of the list of well loved traditional puddings. A quick Internet search brought up one result, from another blogger in 2011. But why? It’s no harder to make than Bakewell tart, has a deliciously unctuous texture like treacle tart, AND has meringue on top. To think what we’ve been missing all these years…

I promise you will not regret making this one!

Cardiff Pudding serves 4

Ingredients

  • 60g butter
  • 75g caster sugar
  • 90g breadcrumbs
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • Grated zest of half a lemon
  • Half a jar of raspberry jam
  • Shortcrust pastry (if you want to make your own, use 150g flour and 75g fat)
  • Another 2 tbsp of caster sugar for the meringue.

Method

Line one standard tart tin, or four small ones, with the pastry. Spread the jam over the pastry.

Beat the sugar, butter and lemon zest together. Beat in the egg yolks.

Add the breadcrumbs. The mixture will be quite stiff, so you may need to use your hands to knead the ingredients together.

Press the breadcrumb mixture over the jam.

Bake in the oven at 190⁰c/170 fan/gas mark 4, until the mixture is set, and browned on top.

Whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks. Sprinkle the sugar in and whisk till firm and glossy. Pile the meringue onto the tart (or tarts) and sprinkle with a little more sugar.

Return to the oven. Bake until lightly browned. Cool on a wire rack.

Spread the word: there’s a new pudding in town.

Garden Party Ice-Cream

Many people have a romantic view of the past; there is a word for it, which for the life of me I can’t remember, meaning a yearning for a past time, a golden age, which perhaps never really existed.

For me it’s the inter-war period – the twenties and thirties – which I tend to view through rose tinted glasses, mainly because all of my knowledge has been gleaned through British novels of the time, 90% of which are dectective stories from the likes of Agatha Christie and Margery Allingham. There may be a body in the library, but there are garden parties, house guests, afternoon teas and the feeling of an endless English summer, populated by independant young women and handsome heroes making eyes at each other in a secluded area of the vicarge garden.

Who needs reality anyway? Forget your troubles for an hour or two with a classic novel and a big bowl of homemade ice cream that tastes like a dream of summertime; layered with strawberry sauce, studded with shortcake and meringue, drizzled with a cheeky lemon syrup, and no cyanide, sparkling or otherwise.

First published July 2019


Garden Party Ice Cream

For the ice cream:

  • 4 egg yolks
  • 300ml milk
  • 80g sugar
  • 300ml double cream
  • 1 tsp cornflour
  • 1/2 tin of condensed milk
  • 6 shortbread biscuits
  • meringue – either made using the left over egg whites or a couple of bought meringue nests.
  • 500g fresh strawberries
  • 1tbsp lemon juice
  • 3 tbsp sugar

First chop the strawberries and put them in a saucepan with the lemon juice. Heat gently until the berries are soft, mash them a little, then stir in the sugar. Allow to cool then pop in the fridge.

Break the biscuits and meringue into chunks (if you made your own using the left over egg whites, you will need about 1/4 of it. The rest can be used as a garnish later). Chill the chunks in the freezer.

Put the egg yolks, sugar and cornflour in a bowl and whisk to combine. Heat the milk to boiling point.

Pour the milk onto the egg yolks, whisking the whole time. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and heat gently, stirring the whole time with a wooden spoon or spatula (the whisk won’t make enough contact with the bottom of the pan, risking a burnt and lumpy custard) until the custard has thickened to the consistency of cream and remove from the heat.

Pour into a large jug and add the double cream and condensed milk. Cool in the fridge.

Make the ice cream following the instruction for your machine. If you don’t have an ice cream machine you can pour the custard into  a 1.5 litre tupperware container and put it in the freezer. Every couple of hours, stir with a fork to break up large ice crystals. When it is fairly thick but still stirable, add the ripple as below.

When the ice cream is ready and working quickly, spoon half of the mixture into a tupperware type container, spread with spoonfuls of strawberry sauce and sprinkle over half of the chunks. Repeat for a second layer. Using a palette knife or simliar, ripple the two mixtures together. Don’t overdo it or it will lose the ripple effect!

Freeze for a few hours or overnight.

Meanwhile make the optional lemon syrup.

Lemon Syrup

  • 400g golden caster sugar
  • zest and juice of 6 lemons, preferably unwaxed.
  • 200ml water

Sterilise a large glass jar or bottle and keep it hot. This can be done in the oven at around 120 degrees, in the dishwasher if you have one, or by heating in boiling water. Wear rubber gloves to avoid burns.

Put the sugar and water into a saucepan and heat very gently until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to the boil and simmer for 5 mins

Add the juice and zest and simmer for another 5 mins.

Very carefully pour into the hot bottle. It has to be hot, otherwise the heat of the syrup will cause it to crack. Remember boiling sugar is INCREDIBLY HOT, please be careful and keep pets and children out of the way.

Allow to cool, then keep in the fridge. As well as a dessert topping you can add soda water to the syrup for a refreshing drink.

Strawberries aren’t actually berries but “accessory fruits”.

Egg Free Cakes – Part 1: Honey Cake

Lockdown. It could have been worse; though, I daresay for many of us It coud have been better. Still, plenty of time for baking right? IF you can get the ingredients of course. A combination of panic buying, and people having nothing better to do than make banana bread, has left the shelves a little bare. I mean, I’m all for people discovering the joys of homebaking, though there is a slight feeling of “hey, I liked baking before it was cool!”

Supposing you have managed to grab the last bag of flour, but what’s this? No eggs! Who is panic buying eggs anyway? If you look online there are various suggestions, often on vegan sites, for alternatives to eggs. Try them if you want, but I always find that recipes that never used ‘X’ ingredient in the first place always turn out (and taste) much better than adapting an existing recipe with alternatives.

So I’m going to share my two favourite egg-free cake recipes: Victorian Honey Cake – also low fat (but not low sugar, you can’t have everything) – and Vinegar Fruit Cake, which is a lot nicer than it sounds, the vinegar just adds a pleasant maltiness.

The honey cake is an adaptation of a recipe found in the first edition of Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management. We like to have it for breakfast. The original recipe calls for cream rather than buttermilk, I have tried it this way, but it’s very dry. Milk also works, if you can’t get hold of buttermilk, both give a nice chewy texture. Use any kind of honey; I like to use a mild honey for the cake, then while it’s still warm from the oven, brush liberally with a stronger tasting honey (Greek, for example). Cut the cake into squares, fingers, or use a cutter to stamp out fancy shapes (keep those lovely trimmings to eat sneakily while no one’s looking).

Victorian Honey cake

  • 4oz (120g) caster sugar
  • 8floz (230ml) buttermilk
  • 10oz (300g) plain flour
  • 1/2 tsp bicarbinate of soda
  • 4tbsp honey
  • More honey for glazing

Grease and line a square 9″ cake tin. Preheat oven to 190/ 170 fan/ gas mark 4.

Mix the sugar and cream together in a large bowl. Sift in the flour and soda and fold into the mixture.

Mix in the honey, and scrape the mixture into the tin.

Bake for around 30 mins (but check after 20), or until the top is a light golden brown and a skewer poked in the middle comes out clean. Cool in the tin for 10 mins, then turn out onto a wire rack to cool. Spread the top generously with more honey while still warm.

Honey bees typically produce 2-3 times more honey than they actually need.

A Proper Seed Cake?

I first posted a recipe for seed cake waaay back in 2015. Having been thinking about Agatha Christie recently I thought I’d give it another go. This time I hadn’t got the right ingredients, and couldn’t be bothered to go to the shops. Not to be deterred I made it anyway, and you know what? – It was even better…

“Are you sitting comfortably? Then I’ll begin…It all started one afternoon. Buttered Crumbs was taking a well earned tea break in front of the telly, watching “At Bertram’s Hotel”, a 1987 BBC adaptation of the Agatha Christie novel of the same name; starring Joan Hickson as Miss Marple. For me she is the definitive Miss Marple, none of the others can quite match up to her performance.

Anyway, Bertram’s Hotel, as well as being a hotbed of crime and intrigue, is known for it’s excellent afternoon teas and traditional cakes. When one of Miss Marple’s cronies is offered seed cake, she asks “Is it proper seed cake?” Hmmm. So what constitutes a “proper” seed cake? Miss Marple must be pretty old by this point; the book was first published in 1965 and she was described as a “white haired old lady” in 1930! We can assume then, that a “proper” cake would be one that they remembered from childhood or the recipe that they used as young women in their own homes, so you’re looking at Victorian times then.

The oldest seed cake recipe I have is from the well known Mrs Beeton, not that it was her recipe of course, she merely collected recipes for publication. Her seed cake is flavoured with (caraway seeds, obviously) nutmeg and copious amounts of brandy. Recipies from my 1930’s and 1950’s collections are flavoured with lemon and mixed peel. A modern “traditional” recipe from Darina Allen, is flavoured with vanilla.

Adapting the Mrs Beeton recipe to contain less brandy and so on, gave a moist buttery cake with a lovely flavour of caraway seeds.”

Here is the recipe for a good old fashioned seed cake, updated for 2019.

“A Very Good Seed Cake”

  • 7oz (210g) Self raising flour
  • ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1oz (30g) ground almonds
  • 5oz (150g) caster sugar
  • 6oz (180g) butter
  • 2tbsp caraway seeds
  • 1tbsp fennel seeds (optional)
  • ½ tsp ground mace or nutmeg (mace is nicer)
  • 100ml Amaretto (almond liqueur)
  • 3 eggs

Grease and line an 8″ round springform or loose bottom cake tin. Pre heat the oven to 170ºc (150 fan, gas mark 3).

Cream together the butter and sugar. Beat in the eggs. Sift over the flour, groand almonds, bicarb and mace, and mix well.

Beat in the amaretto and caraway seeds and fennel seeds if using. Scrape the mixture into the cake tin and bake for 30 to 40 mins. If the cake is browning too much before it’s cooked in the middle, cover with a piece of baking paper.

Cool on a wire rack and invite your Maiden Great Aunt to tea.

Miss Marple first appeared in a short story in 1927 and her first full length novel was “The Murder at the Vicarage” 1930.

Garden Party Ice Cream Part 2

Apparently ‘Poirot and the Bear’ was an epic two parter. Oh, and the ice cream didn’t really feature in the dream. Please see previous post!

Many people have a romantic view of the past. There is a word for it, which for the life of me I can’t remember, meaning a yearning for a past time, a golden age, which perhaps never really existed. For me it’s the inter-war period – the twenties and thirties – which I tend to view through rose tinted glasses; mainly because all of my knowledge has been gleaned through British novels of the time, 90% of which are dectective stories from the likes of Agatha Christie and Margery Allingham. There may be a body in the library, but there are garden parties, house guests, afternoon teas and the feeling of an endless English summer, populated by independant young women and handsome heroes, making eyes at each other in a secluded area of the vicarge garden.

Who needs reality anyway? Forget your troubles for an hour or two with a classic novel and a big bowl of homemade ice cream that tastes like a dream of summertime. Layered with strawberry sauce, studded with shortcake and meringue, drizzled with a cheeky lemon syrup, and no cyanide, sparkling or otherwise. July’s Ice Cream of the Month.

Who do you call when bears invade you garden party? “Why, Hercule Poirot of course!”
(See previous post)

Garden Party Ice Cream

For the ice cream:

  • 4 egg yolks
  • 300ml milk
  • 80g sugar
  • 300ml double cream
  • 1 tsp cornflour
  • 1/2 tin of condensed milk
  • 6 shortbread biscuits
  • meringue – either made using the left over egg whites or a couple of bought meringue nests.
  • 500g fresh strawberries
  • 1tbsp lemon juice
  • 3 tbsp sugar

First chop the strawberries and put them in a saucepan with the lemon juice. Heat gently until the berries are soft, mash them a little, then stir in the sugar. Allow to cool then pop in the fridge.

Break the biscuits and meringue into chunks (if you made your own using the left over egg whites, you will need about 1/4 of it. The rest can be used as a garnish later). Chill the chunks in the freezer.

Put the egg yolks, sugar and cornflour in a bowl and whisk to combine. Heat the milk to boiling point.

Pour the milk onto the egg yolks, whisking the whole time. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and heat gently, stirring the whole time with a wooden spoon or spatula (the whisk won’t make enough contact with the bottom of the pan, risking a burnt and lumpy custard) until the custard has thickened to the consistency of cream and remove from the heat.

Pour into a large jug and add the double cream and condensed milk. Cool in the fridge.

Make the ice cream following the instruction for your machine. If you don’t have an ice cream machine you can pour the custard into  a 1.5 litre tupperware container and put it in the freezer. Every couple of hours, stir with a fork to break up large ice crystals. When it is fairly thick but still stirable, add the ripple as below.

When the ice cream is ready and working quickly, spoon half of the mixture into a tupperware type container, spread with spoonfuls of strawberry sauce and sprinkle over half of the chunks. Repeat for a second layer. Using a palette knife or simliar, ripple the two mixtures together. Don’t overdo it or it will lose the ripple effect!

Freeze for a few hours or overnight.

Meanwhile make the optional lemon syrup.

Lemon Syrup

  • 400g golden caster sugar
  • zest and juice of 6 lemons, preferably unwaxed.
  • 200ml water

Sterilise a large glass jar or bottle and keep it hot. This can be done in the oven at around 120 degrees, in the dishwasher if you have one, or by heating in boiling water. Wear rubber gloves to avoid burns.

Put the sugar and water into a saucepan and heat very gently until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to the boil and simmer for 5 mins

Add the juice and zest and simmer for another 5 mins.

Very carefully pour into the hot bottle. It has to be hot, otherwise the heat of the syrup will cause it to crack. Remember boiling sugar is INCREDIBLY HOT, please be careful and keep pets and children out of the way.

Allow to cool, then keep in the fridge. As well as a dessert topping you can add soda water to the syrup for a refreshing drink.

Strawberries aren’t actually berries but “accessory fruits”.

Bird’s Nest Cookies

“There’s a change in the air, you can smell it. Fresh growth is sprouting under the weak sunshine and the birds in the garden are busy collecting nesting materials. The domestic birds: Verity, Scootaloo, Meg and Moriarty, can feel it too and laying is in full swing. Visitors are compelled to leave with half a dozen eggs whether they like it or not.”

This is an extract from one of my early posts. Sadly all of these hens are long since deceased. They are ‘ex-chickens’, who have shuffled off this mortal coil and ceased to be.* Sadly we no longer keep hens at all; the garden of Crumb Villa is just too small. I do miss them though. The main bird life around here is enormous crows, and seagulls. We don’t live anywhere near the coast, but every morning they wake me up at 5 am shouting “Bleurgh”, or making noises that sound like hysterical crying.

We may not have any fresh eggs to offer visitors anymore, but with Easter over, it’s a good time to buy chocolate eggs at a reduced price and make these yummy bird’s nest biscuits instead. You probably already have recipes for shortbread and chocolate crispy cakes, so go rootle them out and gather the ingredients. You will also need a bag of marshmallows (the proper ones, not Flumps) and about 200g of chocolate mini eggs.

Birds Nest Biscuits

  • A batch of round shortbread bicuits (I used about 10, with some left over). You could use ready made ones if you like.
  • A batch of  chocolate cornflake or rice crispy cake mix
  • Marshmallows
  • Chocolate mini eggs

Bake the shortbread until pale gold in colour (unless you are using store bought).  Cut some marshmallows in half and put half a mallow on each biscuit. Pop them back in the oven for a couple of minutes until the mallow has melted slightly (if using store bought, preheat the oven to a medium high temperature for this step). Transfer them to a wire rack to cool.

Prepare the chocolate cornflake mix. Put a large spoonful of mixture on top of each biscuit, covering the marshmallow. Press three chocolate eggs on top of each one and leave till the chocolate has set.

Don’t do what I did, and try to melt all of the marshmallows at once in a saucepan. You will never get the resulting sticky mess as far as the biscuits; have you ever read the story of Brer Rabbit and the tar baby? Need I say more!

*Search for ‘The Parrot Sketch’ by Monty Python’s Flying Circus on YouTube

Muffin Traybake

So I found the muffin tins eventually, they were in mother-in-law’s garage (long story). Going back to the last post though, I did make the blueberry muffins, in the baking tray I was raving about, and it turned out to be a brilliant idea! The all-in-one traybake format was much quicker and easier than faffing around with paper cases or greasing muffin cups, and it was easier to mark out different portion sizes – very helpful for people like not-so-small-boy, who being diabetic, has to carb count.

Ways to use your traybake muffin:

  • cut it into lots of small pieces for a party
  • serve with custard or cream for dessert
  • something a bit different for breakfast
  • elevenses

I suppose you could use any muffin recipe you liked, but here is the one I used, as usual based on a Susan Reimer recipe. The addition of buttermilk makes these muffins particularly soft and moreish.

Forgive the quality of the photos, I haven’t unpacked my props or digital camera yet!

Blueberry Oatmeal Muffins

  • 8oz (240g) plain flour
  • 2oz (60g) oats
  • 3tsp baking powder
  • 4oz (120g) golden caster sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 3floz (85ml) olive oil
  • 9floz (260ml) buttermilk
  • 1tsp vanilla extract
  • small punnet of blueberries (typically 150g)

Optional glaze:

  • 3oz (90g) sifted icing sugar
  • around 3tbsp double cream (you could use milk instead)

Grease and line either a 30×20 cm traybake tin or a 12 cup muffin tray. Preheat the oven to 190°c / gas mark 5.

Wash the blueberries and cut in half, I know it’s fiddly but you’ll get a better result than leaving them whole.

In a large bowl, mix together the dry ingredients. In a smaller bowl, beat together the egg, oil, vanilla and buttermilk. Add the blueberries to the wet ingredients.

Tip the wet stuff into the dry and stir (NOT beat) until combined. Pour the mixture into the baking tray or divide between the muffin cups.

Bake for 15 to 20 mins, untill the top is golden brown. If you used a baking tray, allow to cool in the tray for 10 mins before transferring to a wire rack, otherwise you risk it splitting into lots of hot, steaming chunks.

Make the glaze by gradually adding the cream to the icing sugar and mixing till smooth and spreadable. It’s hard to be accurate with the liquid measurement, depending on how runny the cream is, you might need a bit more or a bit less. Spread over the muffins while hot. Cut into slices once cool.
Blueberries need to be grown in an acid rather than alkaline soil.

Scone Flavour Ice cream!

Well, after a scorchingly hot late spring, British summertime has settled into the usual pattern of warmish and overcast / warmish and wet. Do a spot of people watching in any public place and you will see…

  • people wearing winter coats, because it’s not sunny;
  • people wearing next to nothing, because it’s SUMMER;
  • bizarre variations on the above, such as the strappy top/Ugg boot combo!

Still, the weather gives us something to talk about at the bus stop, or indeed in a tearoom, over a nice traditional cream tea. What if it is hot and you can’t decide between a scone with clotted cream and jam, or an icecream?

In a sudden flash of genius I thought “why not combine the two?”

And so, that is how scone flavour icecream came to be. First you will need a scone. Of course, I am in favour of an homemade scone, but I suppose a shop bought one would work, though I strongly dissaprove! I’m sure I’ve already posted my favourite scone recipe somewhere, but I’ll probably post it again soon.

Scone Flavour Ice cream

  • 1 scone
  • 300ml milk
  • a 500g (or thereabouts) pot of clotted cream
  • 90g caster sugar
  • 4 egg yolks
  • around 300g strawberries and another 60g of sugar OR half a jar of good quality (and not too thick) strawberry jam/conserve
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice

First flavour the milk by heating it to almost boiling and adding the crumbled up scone. Cover and put to one side.

Next make the strawberry jam ripple. Chop the strawberries and put in a small saucepan. Add the 60g sugar and the lemon juice and heat gently until the strawberries are soft and syrupy. Put to one side. When cold, pop it in the fridge to chill. If you are using jam you can skip this step.

After an hour or two the scone pieces should be very soft. Use a hand blender or food processor or whisk, to thoroughly combine the scone and milk.

Beat the egg yolks and sugar in a large bowl until thick and creamy. Re-heat the milk to almost boiling and pour over the egg yolks, whisking continually. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and stir (with a wooden spoon) over a medium heat, until thickened.

Remove from the heat and stir in the clotted cream. Allow to cool, then chill in the fridge for a couple of hours.

Make the ice cream following your machine’s instructions. When it’s done, scoop into a tub, gently spoon over the strawberry sauce/jam and gently ripple it through the icecrean with a metal spoon. Freeze until firm.

Don’t be put off by the idea of a scone dissolved in milk, it really worked! Maybe I should bring back ice cream of the month, what do you think?

Q: What’s the fastest cake in the world? A: Scone!

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Cake of the month: To the Manor Born

Once upon a time, before the bitter cynicism of adulthood took hold, Buttered Crumbs was a small and adorable child. Papa worked for well known pre packed cake producer Mr Kipling; one of the perks of the job was the monthly complementary box of cakes – a large cardboard box filled with a selection of goodies. As the years went by the box shrunk by degrees until it was small indeed. I’m not sure the employee’s even get one now.

Anyway, it was enourmously exciting to be allowed to unpack the contents onto the table, setting aside the family favourites while others would be passed on to my aged Great Aunts. One of my particular favourites was Manor House cake, described as a “Mouthwatering golden sponge baked with juicy sultanas and topped with a sprinkling of sweet demerara sugar” It had a lovely malty background flavour too, maybe it still does, these days I don’t eat pre packaged cakes if I can avoid them; nasty oversweet things, full of palm oil and humecants.

I still do love a nice light fruit cake though, none of your OTT Christmas cake nonsense! November’s cake of the month is a slightly richer version of my favourite light fruit cake, made so with the addition of traditional ale. The beauty is in it’s versatility, enjoy with a cup of normal or herbal tea or a glass of milk . Eat as a snack, as part of a traditional afternoon tea or as a light meal with fruit and cheese. The kind of cake that is happy being served for tea at Granny’s house or post gala* at Lord and Lady Snob’s country pile.

Malted Ale fruitcake

  • 6oz (180g) self raising flour
  • 1tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 2oz (60g) ground almonds
  • 4oz (120g) butter
  • 6oz light brown sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 3.5oz (105g) sultanas
  • 3.5oz (105g) raisins
  • 3tbsp malt extract
  • 4floz (125ml) ale (I used Old Speckled Hen) or use milk / plant based milk
  • demerara sugar for sprinkling

Grease and line an 8 or 9 inch diameter, deep, loose bottomed or springform cake tin. Pre heat the oven to 160ºc (140 fan, gas mark 3)

Heat the ale, butter, sugar and malt extract until the butter has melted. Add the dried fruit, bring to the boil then simmer for 5 mins. Leave to cool.

Transfer the mixture to a bowl and beat in the eggs.  Sift over the flour, soda and almonds and beat well.

Pour into the cake tin, sprinkle generously with demerara sugar and put in the oven. Cover the top with a square of baking paper to prevent the top cooking before the middle. Depending on your oven it will take from 40 mins to an hour to cook. Test with a skewer after 40 mins just to be on the safe side. Cool on a wire rack.

To make the cake lighter you could use white sugar and milk instead of ale, to make it richer make up some of the weight of the dried fruit with chopped dried figs and apricots and soak them in ale overnight.

To the Manor Born was actually a sitcom starting in 1979, starring Penelope Keith.

Potted Ham For Posher Picnics

Summer may be drawing to an end, but between now and October (contrary to the belief of Mr Crumbs who is a wuss) there will be plenty of warm and sunny days to enjoy a picnic somewhere scenic. In pre fridge days potted ham and other potted meats would have been a staple on every tea table and picnic basket to the point where people got a bit tired of it, there weren’t many ways of keeping meat for just that little bit longer.

In today’s leftovers concious society it’s nice to come across such a thrifty recipe which is so delicious, so good in fact that it is worth making specially on purpose. Serve as a starter if you’re into that sort of thing, for lunch and picnics with crusty bread or crackers or on sandwiches, particularly for afternoon tea (very popular with old ladies)

Many recipes recommend ham hock for potting, I find it too stringy and gelatinous, prefering to buy a gammon or ham joint, slow cook it for tenderness and enjoy a couple of meals from it, then use the leftovers for potting. Just one third of a gammon joint costing £5 will make a couple of ramekins full of potted ham, which is plenty.

Potted Ham

  • leftover cooked ham or gammon joint
  • some of the stock it was cooked in
  • butter

Cut the ham into chunks and put into a food processor. Chop finely.

Add a knob of butter and a splash of stock and process again. Repeat this step until the ham has become a paste.

Pack into ramekins. Cover with clingfilm or seal with clarified butter. To clarify butter, gently heat a couple of ounces in a saucepan until melted, leave to stand for a few minutes to separate. Pour the yellow melted butter over the ham leaving the white milk solids behind

See how the butter is separating into liquids and solids.
See how the butter is separating into liquids and solids.

Pop in the fridge till the butter has set and there you have it! Pack up a picnic and enjoy the autumn sunshine. But do take some waterproofs, just in case!