Tteokbokki for beginners

There isn’t really anything in Western cuisine that can be compared to tteokbokki. If you have ever tried mochi, it’s sort of similar, but chewier and usually savoury. The texture can be something of a surprise to an unaccustomed palate, but if you like it, you’ll find them incredibly moreish.

‘Tteok’ just means a rice cake, nothing like the crispy ones we are used to, but one made from glutinous rice flour, which is mixed to a paste and then steamed. Tteokbokki literally means “fried rice cakes”, but they don’t have to be fried. If you have ever watched a Korean Drama, the characters usually visit a street stand at some point, to buy a tray of tteokbokki in a red, spicy sauce.

You won’t find them in a regular supermarket unless there is a large Korean population in your town. Instead search for an Asian supermarket, there will likely be one in your nearest city centre. Coventry, the city nearest me, has at least four in the centre and one out of town.

Fresh is best, if you can only get frozen, let them thaw out first. If you try to cook from frozen they will split. Don’t try to fry them in a pan that isn’t non-stick, because they stick, BIG TIME. Judy Joo’s suggestion to use a hot grill instead saves a lot of bother, and ruined frying pans. Oh, and you can get pots of microwaveable instant tteokbokki as well, I love it!

Easy Crispy Tteokbokki serves 2

  • 225g cylindrical rice cakes (Tteok or dduk)
  • 1tsp vegetable or olive oil
  • 1tsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 tsp chilli flakes, preferably Korean gochugaru
  • Pinch of salt
  • toasted sesame seeds for sprinkling

Bring a large pan of water to the boil. Add the rice cakes.

When they float to the top they are cooked, remove from the pan with a slotted spoon and put in a bowl.

Add the oils, chilli, and salt and stir to coat evenly. You might need a bit more sesame oil if they look a bit dry.

Spread evenly on a baking tray. Cook under a hot grill for about five minutes, turning once during cooking, until the outside is beginning to blister.

Divide between serving dishes and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Eat as they are, but they’re even better with a sweet chilli dipping sauce.

Korean Food? Yes please!

It’s no secret that I’m slightly obsessed with Korean food, but recipe books aimed at the European Market are few and far between. Yes I could use American ones, but I really don’t get on with cup measurements or directions such as “a scant stick of butter”; surely it’s easier to take away the uncertainty by weighing it? Also why not give the weight as well, like British recipe books do metric and imperial?

I was happy to find this book by Korean American, Judy Joo, who now works as a top chef in London. A lot of the recipes are fusion food, or have “cheffy” touches, so perhaps aren’t quite that simple, but there are still plenty of authentic and traditional dishes to try out.

Korean Food Made Simple – Judy Joo. Jaqui Small LLP, 2016

“Easy and delicious Korean recipes to prepare at home”

So why did you buy it?

Are you kidding? Korean food is awesome, that’s why.

Judge a book by it’s cover…

Actually, I’m not keen on the cover, it’s a bit brash and swirly. I’d prefer something more subtle or more obviously based on Korean art.

Do you use it?

It’s a fairly recent acquisition, so this was a good chance to thoroughly test the book.

What did you make?

Quite a lot! I also made the effort to source some of the more exotic ingredients such as dried anchovies and salted shrimp.

Starting with kimchi, which is the backbone of Korean cuisine, we also tried crispy tteokbokki, Royal tteokbokki, Rappoki (we like tteokbokki)…

Rappoki, a combination of tteokbokki and ramen.
Crispy tteokbokki, a snack to die for!
Royal Tteokbokki.

… Galbi jjim (beef short ribs), sweet and sour beef, and for desert, doenjang salted caramel ice cream. Yep, we love Korean food alright.

Koreans love Chinese food too.
This ice-cream is intense!

Is it still in print?

I’m not sure. New copies are still for sale from some sellers, but it’s mostly used copies at the moment.

Is it worth buying?

I would definitely recommend this book to experienced cooks who want to try something different, or who already have a basic knowledge of Korean food. If you are a beginner then you might find some of the recipes a bit daunting, some are very labour intensive and complex, but then again some are very simple. For me, it’s a keeper.

Spicy Sweetcorn Soup

Alice in Wonderland has to be one of the best loved children’s books ever written. Everybody loves Alice, the Mad Hatter, the White Rabbit and the March Hare. Maybe you have a soft spot for the Dormouse or Bill the lizard? Maybe you’re such a big fan that you’re now into weird cosplay (it happens). Personally, I always loved the part with the Gryphon and the Mock Turtle; though, as a small child the Mock Turtle was a confusing creature. Why did he have a calf’s head? Why the obsession with soup? Well…

…the book was published in 1865, a time when class and status were everything. Turtle soup was the trendy starter of choice at snobby dinner parties. According to Mrs Beeton, the green fat was of particular relish to epicures (eww!). The upper middle class types wanted to imitate the toffs, the middle class types wanted to imitate the upper middle class types, and so on. At the prohibitive cost of 2s per pound not everybody could afford fresh, or even tinned, turtle. What to do then? Veal meatballs were already part of the recipe, so it was a case of keeping the flavourings exactly as they were, but upping the veal content using a calf’s head. You can see what Lewis Carrol did there, right?

The thought of skinning and boiling up a calf’s head is only marginally less icky and gross than the thought of eating turtle with it’s lovely squishy green fat (eww again!). Instead my dears, try this warming spicy sweetcorn soup, perfect for a blustery September day and guaranteed no brains or endangered sealife.

Spiced Sweetcorn soup

Based on a recipe from Delicious Magazine. Serves 4.

  • 4 large corn cobs
  • 6 slices of streaky bacon
  • 2 medium potatoes
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 onion
  • ½ to 1tsp of chilli flakes or similar (I used Korean red pepper powder)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 litre of chicken stock (from a stock cube is fine)
  • ½ oz (15g) butter

Cube the potatoes, slice the onion and crush the garlic. Using a sharp knife, cut the kernels off three of the corn cobs.

In a large saucepan, heat a little olive oil and soften the onion until lightly golden round the edges. Add the crushed garlic and chilli flakes and cook for a minute more.

Add the potatoes, bay leaves and chicken stock. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 20 mins or until the potato is soft.

Pro tip: for more flavour add two of the stripped corn cobs to the boiling soup.

Meanwhile, grill the bacon until it is nice and crispy. Chop into smallish pieces and put to one side. Cut the kernels off the remaining corn cob. In a small frying pan, melt the butter and fry the remaining corn kernels until golden and caramelised.

Blend the soup till smooth (removing the bay leaves and the stripped cobs first). Divide between bowls and sprinkle with the chopped bacon and caramelised corn. Serve with a good fresh crusty bread. I used Tesco’s corn bread, it seemed fitting.

Lewis Carroll was a total grammar nazi, going so far as to insist that can’t should be written as ca’n’t, won’t as wo’n’t etc, as these are (in theory) more “correct”.

Say Kimchi!*

As promised, here is my super quick and easy, not too spicy kimchi, for wimpy Western palates.

For those not in the know, kimchi is a fermented vegetable side dish originating in Korea (they eat it with every meal). It’s usually knock-your-socks-off-spicy and a little bit stinky (trust me you get used to it). My version lets you choose a spice level you’re comfortable with. The stinkiness comes from the fermentation process, which is what preserves the kimchi and makes all those wonderfull prebiotics that get the healthy eating fanatics so worked up!

Apparently eating chillies can increase your life span by up to 13%, coupled with the benfits of fermented food, I’m surprised Koreans don’t live forever.

According to the internet (and scientists, presumably) the benefits of eating kimchi on a regular basis include:

  • aiding digestion and preventing constipation
  • regulating cholesterol and blood sugar levels
  • high in vitamins and antioxidants
  • aiding weightloss
  • encouraging a healthy immune system

Though be warned, it’s made from cabbage, so it can give you some fearsome wind. Don’t eat it for the first time with people you can’t comfortably let rip in front of.

Any large supermarket will stock the ingredients needed, though if you live near an oriental supermarket it’s worth buying the authentic chilli powder and some rice vinegar.

Fish sauce, gochugaru and rice vinegar.

The chilli powder (centre) will be labelled as “red pepper powder” or “gochugaru”, look for the “coarse” type. Gochugaru is a lot milder than regular chilli powder, so it’s used in quite large quantities. If you can’t get any – substitute with normal chilli flakes, but make sure you measure it in teaspoons, not tablespoons! Rice vinegar can be replaced with malt vinegar or distilled (white) vinegar. As for radishes, you can use mooli/daikon radish or a packet of normal salad radishes The long ones are easier to prepare.

Easy Mild Kimchi

  • 1 large chinese cabbage also known as “Chinese leaf”, “pak choi”, or “Napa cabbage” OR a sweetheart cabbage
  • 1 medium sized carrot
  • 1 mooli/daikon radish OR a pack of salad radishes
  • 4 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • a bunch of spring onions
  • Gochugaru powder: 2 tablespoons = mild, 4 tablespoons = medium, 6 tablespoons = hot OR chilli flakes 2 teaspoons etc.
  • 60g or ¼ cup of coarse sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons of fish sauce (found in the Thai food section of the supermarket)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar OR malt or distilled vinegar

You will need a large mixing bowl or Tupperware type container (this is a better option as they have lids), a colander and a very sharp knife.

1. Cut up the cabbage into medium sized chunks and rinse well in the colander.

2. Put the cabbage into the container and sprinkle with the salt. Cover with water. Some recipe books tell you not to use tap water, but I find you get a better fermentaion with tap water rather than bottled. Leave the cabbage at room temperature for at least 24 hours, but no longer than 48 hours.

3. Drain off the brine, reserving half of it (you will need it later). While the cabbage is draining, in the same container, mix the chill powder, fish sauce, garlic, ginger, vinegar and sugar into a paste.

4.Cut the carrot, radish and spring onions into matchsticks and add to the paste.

5. Add the cabbage and mix well. Cover with equal amounts of fresh water and reserved brine.

6. Taste a bit of cabbage. If you think you can handle  more spice, add a bit more chilli. Otherwise, put the lid on and leave to ferment at room temperature for three days (unless the room is hot, in which case find somwhere a bit cooler, but not the fridge). It is essential that you stir the kimchi every day, or the top layer will go grey and weird. After three days put it in the fridge. Your kimchi is now ready to eat.

Eaten straight away, it has a zingy fresh flavour. With time the flavours mature and calm down, and the kimchi will develop a sourish fermented flavour. Serve shredded like coleslaw (it’s fantastic with melted cheese, burgers and hotdogs), as a side dish for Korean or Chinese food, or chopped and fried to add to stir fries.

A classic meal would be Kimchi Fried Rice, really quick and easy to prepare. Allowing a couple of heaped serving spoons of kimchi per person, slice finely, drain well, fry in a little oil until caramelised around the edges. Mix into cooked rice, moisten with a little kimchi juice and gochugaru paste and top with a fried egg.

*When taking a photo in Korea, instead of “cheese” you say “kimchi”!

Nice ‘n’ Spicy

Baby it’s cold outside! A quick to prepare soup, full of warming spices and filling noodles is just the ticket.

Put very simply Laksa is a coconut milk based curry noodle soup,  with either chicken or prawns, originating in the Malaysia/Indonesia/Singapore area. Not so simple is finding an authentic recipe. Thanks to big name chef Jamie Oliver, who I personally find rather annoying, nearly every blogger and recipe sharing site (on the first few search pages) merely trots out his rather apochryphal recipe involving butternut squash. I’m sure it’s very nice, but it’s not Laksa! And as for the asparagus, ewww! Also not a traditional Indonesian vegetable as far as I’m aware, do correct me if I’m wrong!

My version was put together after comparing several recipes and choosing what sounded like the best bits from each one. Rice noodles are the most traditional but feel free to use your prefered variety. If you don’t have fish sauce just use more soy sauce, and if you can’t get hold of lime leaves – don’t worry about it. I used a mixture of white fish and prawns because me and the boys don’t eat anything with an exoskeleton and Mr Crumbs won’t eat fish! Alternatively, use 2-4 chicken portions instead.

Laksa serves 4

  • ½ a bunch of coriander
  • 2 peeled cloves garlic
  • 2 peeled and chopped onions
  • a 4cm chunk of peeled ginger root
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1tsp each of ground coriander, ground cumin, turmeric and chilli flakes
  • 2 kaffir lime leaves
  • 2 fillets of white fish, cut into chunks
  • 200g raw shelled prawns
  • ½ litre fish or chicken stock
  • 1 tin of coconut milk
  • ½ tbsp each soy sauce and fish sauce
  • juice of half a lime (or lemon)
  • enough rice noodles for your family

Whizz the coriander, stalks included, plus the garlic, onions and ginger, in a blender until pureed. You could use a pestle and mortar if you like, but the fumes really get to the eyes!

Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan. Gently fry the puree for 3 mins. Add the powdered spices, chilli flakes and lime leaves and fry for another 2 mins.

Add the stock, coconut milk, soy sauce, fish sauce, fish and prawns. Bring to the boil then simmer gently for 10-15 mins or until the fish is cooked through. Add the lime juice, then taste for seasoning. If it could do with more salt add a little more fish and/or soy sauce.

While the soup is still cooking, follow the instructions on the noodle packet to cook the noodles. It’s best to cook them separately because they give off a large amount of starch, which would give the soup a slightly “slimey” feel in the mouth!

Divide the noodle between bowls and ladle the soup on top. I serve prawn crackers as a side dish.

It is not certain wher the word Laksa comes from, suggestions include the Cantonese for “spicy sand” and the Hokkien for “dirty”.

Autumn Musing and Soup

Personally I’m glad when the season changes, bringing saner temperatures, colourful leaves and an abundant harvest. It feels good to wear boots, scarves and gloves again and to have an excuse to indulge in the rich and hearty cold weather foods that seem a little out of place during the summer. What could be better than a brisk walk along the canal, followed by a steaming mug of hot chocolate and the expectation of a huge bowl of beef stew and dumplings with plenty of Worcester sauce?

I’m looking forward to sharing some rather filling and indulgent recipes over the coming weeks! Let’s start with a family favourite – Tortellini Soup, actually Small Boy doesn’t like it, but everyone else does. I can’t remember where it came from, maybe the Sainsbury’s Magazine? Anyway, depending on how big a serving, you could enjoy it as a light or a main meal. Because of the pasta you don’t really need bread with it. Vegetarian if you choose a meat free pasta.

Tortellini Soup   serves 4-6

  • 1tbsp olive oil
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 onion
  • 1 litre veg or chicken stock (from a cube is fine)
  • 1 tin of chopped tomatoes or passata
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 180g frozen or fresh peas
  • 250g pack of tortellini or other filled pasta
  • 1 tbsp chopped basil (optional)

Finely dice the carrots and onion. Heat the oil in a large saucepan and gently fry the carrots and onion for 5 mins.

Add the stock and tomatoes (I always whizz the tomatoes in a food processor to break them down a little) add the garlic either chopped or crushed. Simmer until the carrots are almost soft (aroung 10 to 15 mins, sometimes longer). Add the peas and simmer until the veg is all cooked through.

Add the pasta and cook for the length of time indicated on the packet, you may need to add a little extra water at this point. When the pasta is cooked through –  stir in the basil and serve.

 

 

Beautiful Soup Of The Month

Alice in Wonderland has to be one of the best loved children’s books ever written. Everybody loves Alice, the Mad Hatter, the White Rabbit and the March Hare. Maybe you have a soft spot for the Dormouse or Bill the lizard? Maybe you’re such a big fan that you’re now into weird cosplay (it happens)? Personally, I always loved the part with the Gryphon and the Mock Turtle. Where other children were into dragons, I always wanted a Gryphon. Part eagle, part lion, that’s pretty darn cool if you ask me!

As a small child, the Mock Turtle was a confusing creature – why did he have a calf’s head? Why the obsession with soup? Well…

…the book was published in 1865, a time when class and status were everything. Turtle soup was the trendy starter of choice at snobby dinner parties. According to Mrs Beeton, the green fat was of particular relish to epicures (eww!). The upper middle class types wanted to imitate the toffs, the middle class types wanted to imitate the upper middle class types, and so on. At the prohibitive cost of 2s per pound, not everybody could afford fresh, or even tinned turtle. What to do then? Veal meatballs were already part of the recipe, so it was a case of keeping the flavourings exactly as they were, but upping the veal content using a calf’s head. You can see what Lewis Carrol did there, right?

The thought of skinning and boiling up a calf’s head is only marginally less icky and gross than the thought of eating turtle with it’s lovely squishy, green fat (eww again!) Instead my dears, I bring you a new monthly feature (maybe): Soup Of The Month, guaranteed no brains or endangered sealife.

Spiced Sweetcorn soup

Based on a recipe from Delicious Magazine. Serves 4.

  • 4 large corn cobs
  • 6 slices of streaky bacon
  • 2 medium potatoes
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 onion
  • ½ to 1tsp of chilli flakes or similar (I used Korean red pepper powder)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 litre of chicken stock (from a stock cube is fine)
  • ½ oz (15g) butter

Cube the potatoes, slice the onion and crush the garlic. Using a sharp knife, cut the kernels off three of the corn cobs.

In a large saucepan, heat a little olive oil and soften the onion until lightly golden round the edges. Add the crushed garlic and chilli flakes and cook for a minute more.

Add the potatoes, bay leaves and chicken stock. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 20 mins or until the potato is soft.

Meanwhile, grill the bacon until it is nice and crispy. Chop into smallish pieces and put to one side. Cut the kernels off the remaining corn cob. In a small frying pan, melt the butter and fry the remaining corn kernels until golden and caramelised.

Blend the soup till smooth (removing the bay leaves first). Divide between bowls and sprinkle with the chopped bacon and caramelised corn. Serve with a good fresh crusty bread. I used Tesco’s corn bread, it seemed fitting.

sweetcornspicy

Lewis Carroll was a total grammar nazi, going so far as to insist that can’t should be written as ca’n’t, won’t as wo’n’t etc, as these are (in theory) more “correct”.

Fast Food

Why are all the spam comments I get, about “cheap football jerseys”? Why would a thirty something English woman blogging about food be remotely interested in or inclined to approve dodgy websites selling knock off American Football shirts? Weird.

Still, supposing you want to watch some mind numbingly dull sporting event on telly, and it happens to be tea time. Maybe you’ve invited a few chums over to join you? Here’s a couple of quick, easy and not too healthy treats that are sure to go down well.

“Hamburger” With Tomato and Gherkin Relish

ham burger

  • a ham or gammon joint
  • a burger bun, fried egg and slice of pineapple for each person
  • 500g cherry tomatoes
  • 5 to 10 gherkins depending on how big they are, chopped into small chunks
  • 2 tbsp chopped chives
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • seasoning

Cook the ham. I prefer to slow cook, using cola/ Dr Pepper/ rootbeer as the cooking liquid.

To make the relish, cut the cherry tomatoes into quarters and put into a bowl. Sprinkle with the sugar, a generous pinch of salt and a good grinding of pepper. Mix well, then add the olive oil, gherkins and chives.

Fry the eggs, toast the buns and cut a generous slice of ham for each person. Fill each bun with a slice of ham, a pineapple ring and a fried egg. Serve the relish on the side.

gerkin salsaSadly, I forgot to take any proper photos of this next one, we were too busy eating!

Bacon Cheeseburger Bomb

burger bomb

Makes about 8

  • a batch of pizza dough ( http://www.butteredcrumbs.co.uk/?p=277 )
  • 500g beef mince
  • streaky bacon
  • Swiss cheese or mild cheddar or processed cheese slices
  • gherkin slices
  • tomato sauce or a tomato burger relish
  • a beaten egg
  • sesame seeds for sprinkling

Make the dough.

Gently fry the mince with a little oil, until cooked. Season with salt, pepper and a dash of Worcestershire or Tobasco sauce. Allow to cool.

Cook the bacon until crispy. Preheat the oven to 190ºc/ 170 fan/ gas mark 4

Divide the dough into eight pieces. Roll each piece into a  6 inch/ 15cm disc.

Put a heaped spoonful of beef, a slice of cheese, a slice of bacon (cut in half), a few slices of gherkin and a blob of sauce inthe centre of each disc.

Wet the edges of the dough and bring them together, squeezing the edges until sealed. Pop the burger bombs on a baking sheet. Brush with beaten eggs and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Bake in the oven until nicely browned on top. I can’t remember how long it took, so keep an eye on them!

Get your mates to bring the brewskies. Go team!

 

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Bacon and Egg Breakfast Butty

Many years ago, before Small Boy was born, Buttered Crumbs used to meet a friend for breakfast and coffee every Tuesday morning at our favourite café.

Normally I would indulge in one of the freshly baked, still warm from the oven, big and fluffy scones. How I wish I had asked for the recipe. Alas! Management changed, the decor changed, the food changed and we haven’t been back since. Such is life!

But I digress, once Small Boy was “a bun in the oven” these wonderful legendary scones became evil and nauseous. Even watching my dear friend putting butter and jam onto her’s filled me with waves of morning sickness! Instead I turned to an unexpected alternative, the cooked breakfast sandwiches. Sausage and mushroom was a winner, but for pure, gooey, calorie laden goodness you couldn’t beat a bacon and fried egg sandwich on white bread, dripping with grease, egg yolk and tomato sauce.

Of course at home you can use British dry cure bacon, free range or backgarden eggs and fancy bread (sourdough for choice) Eat as is, or with a good quality tomato/brown sauce or tomato based chutney. Best when the egg yolks are really runny!

British Food

British food fortnight is sadly ending. British food is traditionally mocked by pretty much everyone, including us. The French sneer, the Italians joke (in Italy trifle is known as zuppa Inglese, literally “English soup”), others may dismiss English food as bland and badly cooked and the English as having poor taste and undiscerning palates. Sadly, thanks to the industrial revoloution and two world wars we were sadly out of touch with quality foods, where to get them and how to bring out the best of the simple ingredients available to us. The writer W. Somerset Maugham famously said “To eat well in England you should have breakfast three times a day” and John Betjeman ridiculed resturant food in his poem “The Town Clerks View”

” Already our hotels are pretty good

For those who’re fond of very simple food-

Cod and two veg., free pepper, salt and mustard,

Followed by nice hard plums and lumpy custard”

In truth British cuisine has always been a melting pot of different influences thanks to the various invaders, settlers and colonialization. Sadly our cool, damp climate isn’t suited to the production of the fruit, veg and herbs and spices grown by our European cousins. What we grow best is meat, hence the traditional meat and two veg, anything more exciting tends to be imported. We do love fancy food though, always have done, from the outlandish sauces of the Middle Ages to today’s national dish – curry. Today thankfully the stereotype no longer fits, we are a nation of foodies (mostly) expecting good food in our resturants, schools, supermarkets etc and with an insatiable appetite for T.V’s food porn. So, you may not like British food but that does not make it intrinsically bad, anymore than me not liking sushi means there is something wrong with it.

Personally I love my nations food, after a cold, wet day of stiff-upper-lipping and drinking tea, there is nothing better than a hearty roast dinner with plenty of meaty gravy, followed by pudding and custard.

One of the nicest things we ate this week was kedgeree. Based on an Indian rice and lentil curry – khichri, and adapted to English tastes and ingredients. It can be as simple as rice with flaked haddock and chopped boiled eggs, dressed with butter and parsley though I prefer this souped up version:

Souped up Kedgeree

  • two small to medium sized fillets of smoked haddock
  • 4 eggs
  • 7½ oz (210g) long grain rice
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • 2 tsp garam masala
  • half a bag of baby salad leaves
  • half a small bunch of fresh coriander
  • 1 tbsp mango chutney
  • butter and oil for cooking
  • milk for poaching
  • salt and pepper

Cook the rice till “al dente”, drain off any remaing water and put to one side. Poach the haddock fillets in milk till just done, around 10 to 15 minutes depending on the thickness of the fish. Boil the eggs for 5 mins then leave in a pan of cold water to cool down.

Shred the salad leaves, finely chop the coriander and put to one side.

Thinly slice the onion and garlic. Fry them gently in about 2 tbsp of olive oil and 1 tbsp of butter till golden. Stir in the spices and cook for 1 minute. Add the flaked fish and rice, a generous pinch of salt and a good grinding of black pepper and stir till everything is lightly coated in spice.

Add the salad leaves, coriander and mango chutney. Stir till the leaves have wilted. Remove from the heat.

Quickly shell the eggs and cut them into quarters. Divide the kedgereee between bowls and top with the boiled egg.

Excellent for lunch or supper or for breakfast if you are a crusty old Major.